© Weingut Langen-Erben

Winery Langen-Erben

Short facts

  • Enkirch
  • Holzfasskeller, Weinversand,…
  • +49 6541 814725

Winery Langen-Erben

The Moselle is one of the oldest cultural landscapes in Europe. So is our winery. The Roman columns in the cellar vault probably come from an abandoned temple in the centre of the village. The Rueff-Röchling winery was first mentioned in a document in 1074 - as 'Ravengiersburger Hof'. The owner at the time, Count Berthold von Stromberg, donated the estate together with all the vineyards and fields to the local monastery. Subsequently, the estate changed hands several times until it was finally taken over by the Adolph Huesgen family from neighbouring Traben-Trarbach. One of the leading winegrowing and trading companies after the Second World War.

Through inheritance division, the winery in Enkirch passed into the hands of Ruth Huesgen as an independent business. She married into the industrial dynasty of the same name with Herrmann Röchling. Her daughter in turn married Paul Rueff, a banker. From now on, the winery bears the double name Rueff-Röchling and is also continued as such by her distantly related nephew, the banker Hubertus Langen. In 2019, he appoints Jan Peter Marxen and Simon Trös to the winery in order to continue a comprehensive modernisation and future-oriented orientation together with them. From now on, the winery is called Weingut Langen Erben.

On the map

Weingasse 7

56850 Enkirch

DE


Phone: +49 6541 814725

E-mail:

Website: www.langen-erben.de

General information

Openings
Appointments by telephone arrangement
Holidaythemes
  • Wine
  • ZG Vielseitig Aktive (O)
  • ZG Vielseitig Aktive (R)
  • ZG Vielseitig Aktive (L)

Next steps

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